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WHERE ARE WE HEADING: A BRIEF HISTORY AND FUTURE OF NAVIGATION

January 13, 2020 - 4:15pm to 5:15pm
Spilker 232

Optics and Electronics Seminar Series

Jan 13, 20204:15 PM, Spilker 232http://campus-map.stanford.edu/index.cfm?ID=04-040 - Map

WHERE ARE WE HEADING: A BRIEF HISTORY AND FUTURE OF NAVIGATION

Doug MeyerTechnical Fellow, Northrop Grumman Systems CorporationWoodland Hills, CAdoug.meyer@ngc.com; 818-715-2222

For at least the past 200,000 years, modern humans have been exploring the world around them. These explorations were driven by the need for food, water, better shelter, and in some cases possibly just for curiosity … ‘what is over that next mountain ridge or on the other side of the valley…’ The earliest explorations were most likely tied to changing of the seasons, animal migration paths, and were done without the aid of navigation tools. As the sphere of human exploration increased beyond the known realm, the need for navigation tools became paramount to provide a means for charting where they went, to allow a means of returning home, and to provide a method of return to the newly discovered lands. Over the course of time more sophisticated navigation tools, such as the sextant and naval chronometer, where developed to allow one’s present position to be determined relative to a starting location or a destination. A significant turning point occurred in the 17th Century with Sir Isaac Newton’s development of the laws of motion. While not obvious at the time, these are the foundation of modern inertial navigation. This talk will discuss some of the methods, the evolution of navigation tools used by early navigators, and will conclude with the current state of the art and what future technologies and sensing modalities hold for the art of navigation.

----------Douglas Meyer is a Technical Fellow in the Navigation and Positioning Systems business area at Northrop Grumman.  He has over 35 years of experience in the development of instruments, sensors, and systems used in navigation, acoustic sensing, and data communications. His current technical interests and activities are directed toward next generation instruments utilizing atom-based sensors, photonic crystal and band gap technology, MEMS, integrated optics devices, and optical fiber.  He is currently working on the next generation of inertial instruments that are based on nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), hemispherical resonator gyro (HRG), as well as MEMS technologies.

Event Sponsor: 
Ginzton Laboratory, SPRC, Applied Physics, Physics, and HEPL
Contact Email: 
ingrid@ee.stanford.edu
Contact Phone: 
650-723-0206

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